Economic Stability and High Quality of Life in Plano, Texas

Situated approximately 20 miles north of Dallas on U.S. 75, Plano, which lies for the most part in Collin County, has more than 274,000 residents. A suburb of Dallas, the city has garnered numerous community accolades in recent years and is considered a prime location for singles or families relocating to the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex.

In 2006 CNN’s Money Magazine named Plano the 11th best place to live in the United States after citing it in 2005 as the best place to live in the Western U.S. In 2008, Forbes selected the city, along with Highland Park and University Park as the “Top Suburbs to Live Well” in the DFW.

Exceptional Ease of Access to the Greater Metroplex

Because Plano is a member of the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) system, commuting into the city is made much easier. The DART system operates light rail, commuter rail, and buses and maintains high-occupancy vehicle lanes in Dallas and 12 of its suburbs. With 45 miles of track, DART is the largest light rail operator in Texas, and has an average daily ridership of 57,000.

Plano is also served by major roadways: U.S. Highway 75 to the east, the Dallas North Tollway to the west, the President George Bush Turnpike to the south, and SH 121 (a toll road) to the north. Preston Road (State Highway 289) also routes through Plano.

Stable Local Economy with Strong Corporate Presence

Many business have located their corporate headquarters in the city including HP Enterprise Services, Frito-Lay, Dr. Pepper, JCPenney, Cinemark Theatres, Ericsson Inc., Siemens PLM Software, and Rent-A-Center. An estimated 80% of the visitors to Plano are there for business purposes and the city owns and operates a medium-sized convention center.

Thanks to a targeted effort on the part of the city, a significant amount of retail presence has been cultivated in the downtown area, anchored by the Shops at Legacy in Legacy Town Center. The multi-use development includes shops, restaurants, apartments, a full-service hotel, and entertainment venues all in a community setting.

Superior Schools and Access to Higher Education

The Plano Independent School district includes 70 campuses with an enrollment of 55,193 making the locale especially attractive for families. The Collin County Community College district has two campuses and there are 16 private schools available locally. Southern Methodist University maintains a campus in Plano with academic programs in business, engineering, education, and computer training (as well as a slate of continuing education courses.)

In the broader Metroplex region, graduating seniors can choose to attend Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, the University of North Texas, the University of Texas at Arlington, the University of Dallas in Irving, and a host of smaller and specialized institutions.

Climate Conducive to Outdoor Activity Most of the Year

North Texas has a humid, subtropical climate, characterized by warm spring and fall seasons with temperature extremes in July and August and again in January and February. A series of days of 100 degrees and more is common in August, with at least one ice storm visiting the area in late January or early February. The wettest month of the year is May.

Plano has four full-time recreation centers: Carpenter, Liberty, Oak Point, and Tom Muehlenbeck. All offer weight rooms, walking tracks, and gymnasiums, as well as class and meeting rooms. The city sponsors adult sports leagues for flag football, softball, and baseball. Year round swimming is available at Oak Point, Tom Muehlenbeck, the Plano Aquatic Center, and Rowlinson Natatorium.

The Plano Parks Foundation hosts events like its annual Arbor Day run while the Arbor Hills Nature Preserve has facilities for off-road cycling, hiking, walking, jogging, and other outdoor activities. A playground and restroom facilities are available and there are three pavilions that may be reserved for gatherings.

Complete Package for Successful Relocation

When the factors of:

– location,

– local economic strength,

– a good educational foundation,

– pleasant climate,

– and exceptional public facilities

… are factored into the resiliency with which North Texas has endured both the economic recession and the collapse of the real estate market, Plano’s attractiveness as a place for singles and families to relocate can hardly be questioned.

A community that began in the 1840s with a sawmill, a gristmill, a store, and a few struggling settlers has evolved into one of the most economically stable suburbs of Dallas. Careful local planning and the prudent use of tax dollars and resources have allowed Plano to develop into a thriving small city where life is complimented, not dominated, by its larger urban neighbors. Few North Texas towns offer as much in terms of amenities and opportunity; altogether a solid and superior relocation choice.

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